30
Dec 10

Asteroid Itokawa Sample Return

Source: Science@NASA


Hayabusa photographs its own shadow on asteroid Itokawa in 2005.
Image credit: ISAS, JAXA

The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's Hayabusa spacecraft returned to Earth with tiny pieces of asteroid Itokawa. In today's article from Science@NASA, a NASA specialist on the Hayabusa science team describes the nail-biting sample return and hints at new results from the ongoing analysis. (read more)

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30
Dec 10

ESA's 2010 Highlights

Source: ESA

2010 has been another great year for ESA with achievements in different areas, including Earth observation, science, human spaceflight and telecommunications. From the launch of Cryosat to the Planck sky scan, from Node-3 with Cupola completing the International Space Station to Paolo Nespoli launched on Soyuz to the ISS, from the Rosetta flyby of asteroid Lutetia to the launch of Hylas providing broadband for Europe. (see source)

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30
Dec 10

Wishes of Happy 2011

EAAE News in behalf of EAAE's Executive Council wishes all subscribers and readers a Happy New Year 2011.

Clear Skies.

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30
Dec 10

NASA seeks Space Technology Graduate Fellowship Applicants


Source: NASA News Release 10-347


NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless during a space walk.
Image credit: NASA/JPL.

NASA is seeking applications from graduate students for the agency's new Space Technology Research Fellowships. Applications are being accepted from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of graduate students interested in performing space technology research beginning in the fall of 2011.

The fellowships will sponsor U.S. graduate student researchers who show significant potential to contribute to NASA's strategic space technology objectives through their studies. Sponsored by NASA's Office of the Chief Technologist, the fellowships' goal is to provide the nation with a pipeline of highly skilled engineers and technologists to improve America's technological competitiveness. NASA Space Technology Fellows will perform innovative space technology research today while building the skills necessary to become future technological leaders.

"Our Space Technology Graduate Fellowships will help create the pool of highly skilled workers needed for NASA's and our nation's technological future, motivating many of the country's best young minds into educational programs and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics," said NASA Chief Technologist Bobby Braun at the agency's Headquarters in Washington. "This fellowship program is coupled to a larger, national research and development effort in science and technology that will lead to new products and services, new business and industries, and high-quality, sustainable jobs. Fellowships will be awarded to outstanding young researchers and technologists positioned to take on NASA's grand challenges and turn these goals and missions into reality."

The deadline for submitting fellowship proposals is Feb. 23. Information on the fellowships, including how to submit applications, is available at:

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