7
Feb 10

Comet Hunting

Note: this post is adapted from Weekend SkyWatcher's Forecast by Tammy Plotner on Universe Today, http://www.universetoday.com/

If you are ready for a challenge why not try spotting 11.8 magnitude Comet Tritton! Now cruising through the constellation of Aries (RA 1h 53.5m Dec 17° 39'), this faint fuzzy won't be the easiest of targets to spot – but then it wouldn't be a challenge, would it? Comet 157P Tritton was discovered by Keith Tritton (U. K. Schmidt Telescope Unit, Coonabarabran) on February 11, 1978. Now, almost 32 years later to the date, it's back again on its every 6.33 year journey around our Sun. Although it won't reach perihelion (closest position to the sun) until February 20, its original estimated return brightness was only expected to reach magnitude 16 and now it is far exceeding expectations. Don't expect to see a flaming ball exhibiting a tail because that's not going to happen… but congratulate yourself if you can find this faint fuzzy in the sky.

Image credit: Universe Today

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7
Feb 10

Comet Hunting

Note: this post is adapted from Weekend SkyWatcher's Forecast by Tammy Plotner on Universe Today, http://www.universetoday.com/

If you are ready for a challenge why not try spotting 11.8 magnitude Comet Tritton! Now cruising through the constellation of Aries (RA 1h 53.5m Dec 17° 39'), this faint fuzzy won't be the easiest of targets to spot – but then it wouldn't be a challenge, would it? Comet 157P Tritton was discovered by Keith Tritton (U. K. Schmidt Telescope Unit, Coonabarabran) on February 11, 1978. Now, almost 32 years later to the date, it's back again on its every 6.33 year journey around our Sun. Although it won't reach perihelion (closest position to the sun) until February 20, its original estimated return brightness was only expected to reach magnitude 16 and now it is far exceeding expectations. Don't expect to see a flaming ball exhibiting a tail because that's not going to happen… but congratulate yourself if you can find this faint fuzzy in the sky.

Image credit: Universe Today

Twitter del.icio.us Digg Facebook linked-in Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon