3
Feb 10

Mars

If you have been out looking at the sky between about 8h00 pm and 9h00 pm, you may have noticed a particularly bright orange/red star slightly to your west (to your left when looking south) and quite “high” in the sky - this is not a star, it’s the planet Mars, the red planet!

If you have a pair of binoculars you may be able to make out the “disc” of the planet and with even a small telescope you should be able to see the white pole cap.

As well a this, Mars is quite close to an open star cluster (M44) and if you take a look over a few nights you should be able to spot Mar’s movement against the background stars.

Image credit: spaceweather.com
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3
Feb 10

Mars

If you have been out looking at the sky between about 8h00 pm and 9h00 pm, you may have noticed a particularly bright orange/red star slightly to your west (to your left when looking south) and quite “high” in the sky - this is not a star, it’s the planet Mars, the red planet!

If you have a pair of binoculars you may be able to make out the “disc” of the planet and with even a small telescope you should be able to see the white pole cap.

As well a this, Mars is quite close to an open star cluster (M44) and if you take a look over a few nights you should be able to spot Mar’s movement against the background stars.

Image credit: spaceweather.com
Twitter del.icio.us Digg Facebook linked-in Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon