27
Jan 10

Solar Eclipse seen from Space

Source: ESA

The annular solar eclipse on 15 January 2010 was observed by the Sun-imaging SWAP (Sun Watcher using APS detectors and imaging processing) instrument on ESA's Proba-2.


The solar Eclipse on January 15th seen by the sattelite Proba-2. Credits: ESA/ROB

This is the same solar eclipse observed on the ground from Africa and Asia, the longest eclipse of the new millennium. It is termed 'annular' because the Moon is further away from the Earth than during a total eclipse, so only part of the Sun is covered. (read more)

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27
Jan 10

Black Hole Hunters Set New Distance Record

Source:ESO News Release 04/10


Artist's impression about the black hole inside NGC 300 X-1. Credit: ESO/L.Calçada.

Astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope have detected, in another galaxy, a stellar-mass black hole much farther away than any other previously known. With a mass above fifteen times that of the Sun, this is also the second most massive stellar-mass black hole ever found. It is entwined with a star that will soon become a black hole itself. (read more)

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27
Jan 10

Star Bright

In a previous posting we looked at the fact that not all stars are the same colour, this time we’ll take a look at their brightness. You will have noticed (I hope) that when looking at Orion, not all the stars are of the same brightness. Betelgeuse (top left) and Rigel (bottom right) are much brighter than the stars top right and bottom left which are in turn brighter than the three stars that make up the “belt”!

So, why are some brighter than others? Are they closer? Are they Bigger? Are they hotter? Are they all three? Take some time to think about it (and maybe look at some other stars) and we’ll talk about it in the next posting.

Image credit: Wikipedia - Mouser Williams

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27
Jan 10

Star Bright

In a previous posting we looked at the fact that not all stars are the same colour, this time we’ll take a look at their brightness. You will have noticed (I hope) that when looking at Orion, not all the stars are of the same brightness. Betelgeuse (top left) and Rigel (bottom right) are much brighter than the stars top right and bottom left which are in turn brighter than the three stars that make up the “belt”!

So, why are some brighter than others? Are they closer? Are they Bigger? Are they hotter? Are they all three? Take some time to think about it (and maybe look at some other stars) and we’ll talk about it in the next posting.

Image credit: Wikipedia - Mouser Williams

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