16
Jan 10

What colour are stars?

If you asked someone what colour stars are, they would probably say white, and they wouldn't be wrong; however, not all stars are white.

Go and take a look at the stars we have been talking about in previous postings; Betelgeuse (top left of Orion), Rigel (bottom right of Orion), Aldeberan (found by the following the imaginary line through the "belt" upwards to the right) and Sirius (found by the following the imaginary line through the "belt" downwards to the left).

Take a good careful look at these stars and in the next posting we'll talk about theirs colours!

Twitter del.icio.us Digg Facebook linked-in Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon
16
Jan 10

What's the colour of the stars?

If you asked someone what is the colour of the stars, they would probably say white; they wouldn't be completely wrong; however, not all stars are white.

Go and take a look at the stars we have been talking about in previous posts; Betelgeuse (top left of Orion), Rigel (bottom right of Orion), Aldeberan (found by the following the imaginary line through the "belt" upwards to the right) and Sirius (found by the following the imaginary line through the "belt" downwards to the left).

Take a good careful look at these stars and in a future post we'll talk about their colours!

Twitter del.icio.us Digg Facebook linked-in Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon
16
Jan 10

Annular Eclipse on Southeastern Countries

Source: Wikipedia

On January 15th there was an annular eclipse, but it wasn't visible from the majority of the European territories.


Cropped image of full annular solar eclipse as seen in Bangui, Central African Republic at 05:19:04 GMT (6:19 a.m. local time). The bottom 'noise' are clouds. Source: Wikimedia; Author: Tino Kreutzer.

The eclipse was visible as only partial eclipse in much of Africa, Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Asia. It was seen as annular eclipse within a narrow stretch of 300 km (190 mi) width across Central Africa, Maldives, South Kerala (India), South Tamil Nadu (India), Sri Lanka and parts of Bangladesh, Burma and China.

This was the longest annular solar eclipse of the millennium, with a maximum length of 11 mins and 7.8 seconds.

The next eclipse that will be longer than this one will occur on December 23rd, 3043. (read more)

Twitter del.icio.us Digg Facebook linked-in Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon