11
Jan 10

What is Planck Mission doing?

Source: Space Pragmatism

CMB as expected to be seen by Planck. Credit: ESA

Herschel and Planck were launched on May 14th 2009. After the appropriate operations of both missions the Space Telescopes are now in orbit around the Lagrangian point L2. Herschel has already begun to deliver impressive pictures some time ago quite ahead of schedule.

Planck has a much more difficult mission because after the COBE mission it also has to have a better image  of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) than WMAP.  Preliminary results presented on September 19th, 2009, said the the acquired data was excelent. What is happened with Planck?

It seems mission teams are working but results won't be visible for a while. (read more)

Links:

Planck Mission

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11
Jan 10

Orion

This is a great time of the year to see one of the largest and most spectacular constellations in the sky – Orion, the hunter. It is extremely easy to locate, simply go outside at about 9 pm, face south, look up to about 45° degrees above the horizon and there it is! The first thing that should strike you is the three bright stars in a row from “bottom left to top right”, this is the hunter’s belt and is in the middle of the constellation; surrounding the belt at roughly similar distances are four bright stars, which are considered to represent the outline of the hunter's body, and, descending from the 'belt' is a smaller line of three stars (the middle of which is in fact not a star but the Orion Nebula), known as the hunter's 'sword'.

If you have a pair of binoculars, take a look at the sword and you should be able to see the “hazy” form of the Orion nebula – an area where new stars are being formed!

Orion contains two of the brightest stars in the sky, above and to the left of the belt you will find a reddish star called Betelgeuse and below and to the right of the belt you will find a bluish star called Rigel.

In the next posting we’ll see how Orion can be used to find some other interesting objects in the sky.

If you would like to learn more about Orion, take a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_(constellation)

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11
Jan 10

Orion

This is a great time of the year to see one of the largest and most spectacular constellations in the sky – Orion, the hunter. It is extremely easy to locate, simply go outside at about 9 pm, face south, look up to about 45° degrees above the horizon and there it is! The first thing that should strike you is the three bright stars in a row from “bottom left to top right”, this is the hunter’s belt and is in the middle of the constellation; surrounding the belt at roughly similar distances are four bright stars, which are considered to represent the outline of the hunter's body, and, descending from the 'belt' is a smaller line of three stars (the middle of which is in fact not a star but the Orion Nebula), known as the hunter's 'sword'.

If you have a pair of binoculars, take a look at the sword and you should be able to see the “hazy” form of the Orion nebula – an area where new stars are being formed!

Orion contains two of the brightest stars in the sky, above and to the left of the belt you will find a reddish star called Betelgeuse and below and to the right of the belt you will find a bluish star called Rigel.

In the next posting we’ll see how Orion can be used to find some other interesting objects in the sky.

If you would like to learn more about Orion, take a look here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_(constellation)

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11
Jan 10

New tidal streams found in Andromeda reveal history of galactic mergers

Source: UC Santa Cruz


M31, the Andromeda Galaxy. Credit: Robert Gendler.

An international team of astronomers has identified two new tidal streams in the Andromeda galaxy, the remnants of dwarf galaxies consumed by our large galactic neighbor.

Analysis of the stars in Andromeda's tidal streams and other components of its extended halo is yielding new insights into the processes involved in the formation and evolution of massive galaxies. (read more)

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