4
Jan 10

Kepler Discovers Five Exoplanets

Source: NASA Science News


Artists concept of the Kepler Space Telescope
with distant solar system. Credit: NASA.

NASA's Kepler space telescope, designed to find Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of sun-like stars, has discovered its first five new exoplanets. (read more)

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4
Jan 10

Closing the Loop for ALMA

Source: ESO Organisation Release 01/10

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has passed a key milestone crucial for the high quality images that will be the trademark of this revolutionary new tool for astronomy. Astronomers and engineers have, for the first time, successfully linked three of the observatory's antennas at the 5000-metre elevation observing site in northern Chile.

Having three antennas observing in unison paves the way for precise images of the cool Universe at unprecedented resolution, by providing the missing link to correct errors that arise when only two antennas are used. (read more)

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4
Jan 10

Astronomers Find World with Thick, Inhospitable Atmosphere and an Icy Heart

Source: ESO


Artists impression of the extrassolar planet. Credit: ESO/L.Cal├žada

Astronomers have discovered the second super-Earth exoplanet [1] for which they have determined the mass and radius, giving vital clues about its structure. It is also the first super-Earth where an atmosphere has been found. The exoplanet, orbiting a small star only 40 light-years away from us, opens up dramatic new perspectives in the quest for habitable worlds. The planet, GJ1214b, has a mass about six times that of Earth and its interior is likely to be mostly made of water ice. Its surface appears to be fairly hot and the planet is surrounded by a thick atmosphere, which makes it inhospitable for life as we know it on Earth.(read more)

Related links:
Portal to the Universe

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4
Jan 10

AN INDICATION FOR THE BINARITY OF P CYGNI FROM ITS SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ERUPTION

Source: arXiv


Comparison of an LBV and the Sun. Credit: University of Florida/Meghan Kennedy.

P Cygni is a good example of an LBV, it has many interesting characteristics in its own right. It was discovered on August 8th, 1600, when it suddenly appeared, flaring up to 3rd magnitude. Over the next hundred years it continued to fade and brighten up what allowed it to be considered as variable. Flares have also been associated to the variability of the star when it brightens.

It now seems possible that the flares may be due to the presence of a second star in orbit around P Cygni. (read more)

Related links:
Universe Today

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4
Jan 10

The observational blog site for the EAAE

Dear readers

As you know the EAAE is under big website transformations.
This blog has been built to provide observational alerts about astronomical events that can be seen during the following nights.
The responsible for this blog will be Bob Larcher an EAAE member that has a long term collaboration history with the French section of the EAAE and that is now part of the EAAE's webteam.

We hope you will enjoy it.

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4
Jan 10

The observational blog site for the EAAE

Dear readers

As you know the EAAE is under big website transformations.
This blog has been built to provide observational alerts about astronomical events that can be seen during the following nights.
The responsible for this blog will be Bob Larcher an EAAE member that has a long term collaboration history with the French section of the EAAE and that is now part of the EAAE's webteam.

We hope you will enjoy it.

Twitter del.icio.us Digg Facebook linked-in Yahoo Buzz StumbleUpon